Tree Planting in Ghana

Written by Alice Rees on . Posted in Ghana, News & Updates, Upcoming Events

In late July, Nektarina Non-Profit and its local partners Peter & Lisa Organization Ghana (PLOG) conducted a large scale activity planting over 200 trees in selected spaces in the Volta region of Ghana.

Over a hundred school children joined in the event, getting their hands dirty and assisting with the tree planting. There were also people from the local communities, teachers, parents, and representatives from the District Chief Office, the Education Ministry, the Forestry Commision, and NADMO, along with anyone else who wanted to participate – the event was open to all.

The trees were planted around the Quarters Area in Jasikan, with particular attention given to the hospital project land. The planned hospital will be a great benefit to the entire region and the country as a whole, so being involved in readying the plot of land with our trees was a huge honour for PLOG and Nektarina.

While the children involved thoroughly enjoyed themselves, enthusiastically getting involved with digging and planting, they were also fascinated by the reasons why we were engaging in this activity. After some educational activities and awareness talks, they left with a new appreciation for this most vital part of our environment.

PLOG and Nektarina will care for and maintain the sapling trees for six months, at which point the Teak trees will be robust enough to continue growing without frequent care. Teak trees can grow to be well over 20m tall and frequently live to be hundreds of years old (the oldest is over 1,500), so the tree planting activity was not only a fantastic experience for everyone in attendance, but will continue to provide joy to the region for many years to come.


teak treeSuch was the success of this event, the team have been asked to take on an additional tree planting activity, this time taking place over 2 days (30th – 31st October), planting around 3,000 trees!

With over 300 children expected to attend, this activity aims to educate them on the importance of environmental sustainability, particularly within their local communities. It will also teach the value of carbon offsetting, and promote tree planting as a key way people can offset their carbon footprints. This will be tied together with general lessons about climate change and the importance of forests in regulating our environment.

Representatives from multiple government bodies are expected to be in attendance, including the Ministry of Education; the Ministry of Environment, Science, & Technology; the Ministry of Lands & Forestry; the Forestry Commission; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the National Disaster Management Organisation. Mr. Abrampah Kilian, the District Assembly Chief Executive of Jasikan, is also expected to appear at the event. Peter Nana, the Country Manager for Ghana for Education for Sustainability, says “I can’t wait to bring this activity to the children, many of whom will not have had the opportunity to participate in a similar exercise. It is vital that we instil the value of a sustainable life as early as possible, and this is a great start to that.”

In cooperation with the Forestry Research Department, teak trees have been selected to plant, because of their capacity to have a positive impact on the environment by oxygenating the air, by providing stability to the ground, and by acting as windbreakers.

“You Have Not come here to just enjoy Lima”

Written by Anam Gill on . Posted in Anam's blog: Global issues, Cameroon, General Information, Ghana, Green Economy, India, News, News & Updates, Publications, Regions, Sierra Leone, Take Action, Trinidad and Tobago

1017932Manuel Pulgar Vidal , President of COP20 addressing the audience in Lima

Photo Source: Google

“This is the time to take decisions…we want to give a clear and strong message that we want to take this process forward…you have not come here to just enjoy Lima…we must not accept to leave Lima with empty hands ” Manuel Pulgar Vidal said in a passionate appeal to the negotiators on the second last day of COP 20.

Vidal who was acting as the President of the conference or COP 20 (Conference of Parties) shared the disappointed of many that no progress was made on the negotiating text. With just one more day to go till the end of the conference and negotiations it was indeed saddening to see another deadlock looming on the horizon.

When we talk about global climate agreement one question that pops out is; with the global political crisis, where most countries are at war with each other both physically and otherwise, will they ever be able to negotiate in terms of climate justice?  I have been asking this question a lot and have never come across a sane explanation. In an extremely unjust world ruled by people who value profit is it even possible to talk about climate justice? Are we just fooling ourselves trying to make a difference by attending these important meetings visited by the many heads of states who are good at posing for photographs with the delegates but not drafting sound agreements?

Climate talks have remained deadlocked be it Brazil or Lima. Defeated in Brazil we thought we have a battle to fight in Lima where we may win and now we are looking forward to Paris in 2015. Is it just about wasting another year? When it comes to climate can we really afford to waste these many years? What are we waiting for?

These glorious opportunities that bring so many countries together should be made use of properly without wasting too much time, money and energy. There was an Ad-hoc Working Group on Durban Platform (ADP) at the COP 20 that was supposed to decide how various countries will contribute in the fight against climate change. The contributions that will be determined nationally are called Intended Nationally-Determined Contributions (INDCs). The INDCs will form the backbone of the global climate agreement that is expected to be finalized at the next climate conference in Paris in 2015.

Unfortunately there are disagreements existing on several issues related to INDCs. Regarding the actions that have to be taken by developed countries in reducing greenhouse gas emissions before 2020 there isn’t a clear understanding. By using the jargons many countries try to get away without presenting a clear action plan. The mitigation/adaptation debate over the INDCs and whether these contributions should be put to an international review had been slow.

The frustrating slow pace of the Lima negotiations does disappoint many around the globe including the developing world that is mostly on the receiving end. Developing world is most affected by the decisions made by the developed world that even ship its waste to the global South. Also some countries in the developing world  clearly have other priorities.

According to Al Jazeera “China has said emissions will peak by 2030, while India chose to put economic growth ahead of emissions caps.”

How many more conferences and drafts do we need to understand and acknowledge the unforeseen adversity in the years to come?

AlJazeera reported :

 “ In Peru, the venue for this year’s crucial climate change conference, illegal logging continues at unprecedented rates.”

 “The capital of Indonesia, Jakarta, is a city under threat as it is sinking at a rate of seven centimetres every year. By 2030, according to experts, half of the city will be below sea level. Step Vassen reports from the Indonesian capital.”

 “In South Sudan, many people are chopping down trees just to exist. The country’s oilfields generate billions of dollars a year, but all the oil is exported, leaving millions of people to rely on wood and charcoal for fuel. The current rate of deforestation will mean no forest will be left in South Sudan within three or four decades.”

And the list goes on. The empty slogans made by the politicians demanding actions against climate change in not enough. Someone rightly said that with great power comes great responsibility. Here I would like to make an urgent appeal to the world leaders/politicians to take up this responsibility without wasting more time.

Project’s expansion

Written by Marianne on . Posted in Cameroon, General Information, Ghana, News, Sierra Leone

Nektarina Non Profit is happy to announce the expansion of the Education for Sustainability project in Africa. As we care about adapting our global approach to local contexts, having representative and partners in the countries we are active is fundamental. After contacts and fruitful discussions with local representative, three countries have been added to the project.

In Ghana, we are now working with Pet & Lisa Organization to implement the project. The Ghanaian non-profit organization, led by Peter and Lisa Obrempong, was founded in 2011 to ‘Recruit, support, educate, empower and establish the poor, needy, street and homeless children and youth in their future livelihood and career development’. The first significant event we are implementing together aims to inform and sensitize youth of the Volta Region on sustainability issues and on the need for sustainability education and practices as a way of life.

The E4S project is being implemented in Cameroon through our local representative Jean Paul Brice Affana in Yaoundé. With a solid background on tackling sustainability issues at national and international level, and experience in promoting the importance of education for sustainable development, our partner has now started the implementation of the project in Cameroon. The ‘Children and Youth Drawing Competition and Teachers’ Workshop on Education for Sustainable Development’ is ongoing.

While we were partnering with our local representative in Sierra Leone, the Ebola virus outbreak emerged and developed in the country and its neighbouring countries. The Ebola is one of the most serious viral diseases in humans. The case-fatality rate can reach 90%. The current outbreak occurring in West Africa has generated more cases and caused more deaths than previous outbreaks. A state of emergency has been declared by the president to fight the disease. All charities and volunteers have been alerted and requested to carry out sensitization, education and material support in their areas of operation as an addition to government’s efforts to government’s effort. We are supporting our local representative George Mansaray, a social worker and sustainable development teacher, in all the activities he is carrying out with communities.

You will find more information about all these activities soon on our website, facebook page and Flickr.